Watching bluebirds? Thank these local students


Staff Report



Penny and Fritz Brandau are shown here with Eric Robson’s ninth grade students at the Lorain County JVS.


Courtesy photo

Located on golf courses, cemeteries, and on township, city, and park properties in Lorain County are more than 30 bluebird trails containing over 450 bluebird nest boxes.

These birdhouses, or man-made nesting cavities, are sanctuaries and homes for thousands of native birds to raise their young during a time when so much of their natural habitat has been destroyed.

Keeping track of what birds inhabit which box at any given time can be difficult. This is where the ninth- and 10th-graders of the Lorain County JVS stepped in to help.

For the past few years, students have engraved more than 200 name plates and hundreds of number plates that are used to identify the bird boxes throughout the county.

These bird boxes are created for the Black River Audubon Society, a chapter of the National Audubon Society. Penny and Fritz Brandau are members of the society and stopped in at the JVS to say thank you for the work that has been done.

“It is important to Penny and I that you all know how significant these plates are and understand the bigger picture of these houses, like the research at Cornell University that is being done with the data that is collected from each bird house,” Fritz Brandau said. “These name and number plates look so professional. You all did a great job.”

The National Audubon Society’s mission is to conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds and other wildlife for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity.

Penny and Fritz Brandau are shown here with Eric Robson’s ninth grade students at the Lorain County JVS.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2017/04/web1_BirdHouses.jpgPenny and Fritz Brandau are shown here with Eric Robson’s ninth grade students at the Lorain County JVS.

Courtesy photo

Staff Report