Wellington police auxiliary adds five new officers, promotes sergeant


By Catherine Gabe - cgabe@civitasmedia.com



Photos by Catherine Gabe | Wellington Enterprise

Newly-sworn in members of the Wellington auxiliary police include Morgan Guyot, Scott Pruchinsky, Matthew Potts, Bruce Hughes, Cynthia Bjork, and Charles Zvosek.


Auxiliary police officers Charles Zvosek and Gregory Taylor also take an oath outlining their duties and responsibilities, including their agreement to work 10 hours a month.


Lt. Rick Kimbler fills out the monthly schedule, which is filled with school basketball games duty.


Thank the Wellington Auxiliary Police the next time you attend a sporting event. After all, they’re the people protecting the money, the crowd and the referees.

“Police are here to serve and protect. We’re here to serve and assist,” said Harold Scyoc, an auxiliary police member since 1980, speaking at this year’s organizational meeting. “If we’ve got somebody stupid enough who wants to join the auxiliary, we’ll let ‘em,” he joked.

New members sworn in last Wednesday were Cynthia Bjork, Morgan Guyot, Bruce Hughes, Scott Pruchinsky, and Charles Zvosek. Sgt. Matthew Potts was also sworn in with the new members.

The auxiliary was formed after the fatal 1960 New York Central passenger train wreck. Local resources were nearly overwhelmed and the organization was based on lessons learned from the disaster, which resulted in four deaths and 51 injuries, said Capt. Lawrence Querin.

Other experiences such as the Palm Sunday tornado, the Fourth of July flood, and 9/11 showed communities must be prepared to stand on their own until additional help arrives, said Querin.

Enter the Wellington auxiliary police.

While they’re prepared to assist in event of disasters, you’ll see them most often at sporting events, helping with parking at the Lorain County Fair, at the Cheese Festival, or just about anywhere there’s a crowd.

Officers are expected to work 10 hours a month. They go through a two-month training program with the Lorain County Sheriff’s Office and the auxiliary holds continual training topics.

They are not paid. The local schools pay the auxiliary about $600 annually for help and assistance at sporting events. The income is used to purchase supplies and maintain equipment.

“You get no compensation for what you do, but you do it for the love of the profession and the love of serving and you can’t put a price on that,” said mayor Hans Schneider. “You are valued and appreciated.”

Catherine Gabe can be reached at 440-647-3171 or @ReporterGabe on Twitter.

Photos by Catherine Gabe | Wellington Enterprise

Newly-sworn in members of the Wellington auxiliary police include Morgan Guyot, Scott Pruchinsky, Matthew Potts, Bruce Hughes, Cynthia Bjork, and Charles Zvosek.

http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2016/01/web1_IMG_0717.jpg

Photos by Catherine Gabe | Wellington Enterprise

Newly-sworn in members of the Wellington auxiliary police include Morgan Guyot, Scott Pruchinsky, Matthew Potts, Bruce Hughes, Cynthia Bjork, and Charles Zvosek.

Auxiliary police officers Charles Zvosek and Gregory Taylor also take an oath outlining their duties and responsibilities, including their agreement to work 10 hours a month.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2016/01/web1_IMG_0730.jpgAuxiliary police officers Charles Zvosek and Gregory Taylor also take an oath outlining their duties and responsibilities, including their agreement to work 10 hours a month.

Lt. Rick Kimbler fills out the monthly schedule, which is filled with school basketball games duty.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2016/01/web1_IMG_0735.jpgLt. Rick Kimbler fills out the monthly schedule, which is filled with school basketball games duty.

http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2016/01/web1_IMG_0736.jpg

By Catherine Gabe

cgabe@civitasmedia.com